Friday, 28 July 2017

Stikins ® & Trons ®: The Tale Of Names From The World Of Beatrix Potter

https://www.stikins.co.uk/





Helen Beatrix Potter was born on the 28th July 1866, so today we’re taking a look at some of the names of her best known creations to see how popular they have proven to be (with our customers at least!).

Beatrix Potter wrote 24 children’s tales beginning with “The Tale Of Peter Rabbit” (1902) – a book which has since been translated into 36 languages and has sold over 45 million copies (making it one of the best-selling books of all time!).

In addition to being an author and illustrator, Beatrix was also a natural scientist, farmer, and conservationist – the Lake District National Park is largely made up of land that she is credited with preserving. She studied a wide variety of subjects including archaeological artefacts, fossils, insects, and plants, and she became a widely respected expert in the field of mycology (the study of fungi).

Mrs Rabbit with Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail, and Peter
Illustration by Beatrix Potter (via Wikimedia Commons)
Beatrix and her brother (Walter Bertram) shared a love of the countryside and both were talented artists; they made endless drawings and paintings of their childhood pets and the country estates that they visited during the summer holidays. In the 1890s, they began printing cards for Christmas and other special occasions as a way to earn money and Beatrix often used mice and rabbits as the subjects of her paintings. Some of her animal drawings (including several of her pet rabbit, Benjamin Bunny) were bought by Hildesheimer and Faulkner as illustrations for books that they were publishing – inspiring Beatrix to publish her own illustrated stories.

She often added small sketches to the letters that she sent to young friends and amongst these was a letter she wrote to the eldest son of her former governess; Noel was often ill and so Beatrix wrote a short story to amuse him – a tale about “four little rabbits whose names were Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail, and Peter”. It was this letter that Beatrix chose as the starting point for the first of her tales; “The Tale Of Peter Rabbit”.

While our customers haven’t used some of Beatrix’ more whimsical character names for their children (meaning, sadly, we haven’t printed any labels for a Flopsy, Mopsy, OR a Cottontail – or indeed anyone named Twinkleberry, Duchess, Simpkin, Hunca Munca, Moppet, Mittens, Kep, Pickles, or Diggory Delvet), we’ve seen plenty of orders for names that feature in the world of Beatrix Potter…
  • Peter (Rabbit); the hero of Beatrix’ first tale was named after her childhood pet rabbit, “Peter Piper”.
  • Benjamin (Bunny); Peter’s cousin was named for another of Beatrix’ pet rabbits.
  • Tom (Thumb and Kitten); the name of one of the “Two Bad Mice” (named for one of two mice that Beatrix rescued from a trap in her cousin’s kitchen) and the kitten who featured in his own tale.
  • Tiggy (-Winkle, Miss); the hedgehog washerwoman inspired by Kitty Macdonald (a Scottish washerwoman employed by the Potters during their summer holidays at Dalguise House) and named for Beatrix’ pet hedgehog.
  • Jeremy (Fisher); the frog fisherman inspired by Beatrix’ childhood pet frogs and her father’s love of sport fishing.
  • Tabitha (Twitchit); a character who pops up in five of Beatrix’ tales and was inspired by a cat (called Tabitha Twitchit) that lived on Hill Top Farm (bought by Beatrix in 1905).
  • Jemima (Puddleduck); based on a duck that lived at Hill Top Farm, this character was (most likely) named for Jemima Blackburn (an ornithological painter and illustrator whom Beatrix greatly admired).
  • Samuel (Whiskers); a rat named after a previous pet owned by Beatrix – a fancy rat called Sammy.
  • Anna (Maria); Samuel Whisker’s wife who appears in “The Tale Of Samuel Whiskers”, which was inspired by an invasion of rats at Hill Top Farm.
  • Ginger; a cat who features in “The Tale Of Ginger and Pickles” and was named after Tommy Bunkle – a cat belonging to a schoolmistress in the town of Sawrey (the town near to Hill Top Farm).
  • John (Dormouse); “The Tale Of Ginger and Pickles” was dedicated to John Taylor (the owner of the shop that inspired the tale) and he was included in the tale as the character John Dormouse.
  • Timmy (Tiptoes and Willie); the name of both Timmy Tiptoes (a squirrel who features in his own tale) and Timmy Willie (the country mouse who features in “The Tale Of Johnny Town-Mouse”).
  • Tommy (Brock); the badger who is the arch enemy of the fox “Mr Tod”.
  • Johnny (Town-Mouse); the friend of Timmy Willie (the country mouse) was inspired by Dr Parsons, a friend of Beatrix’ husband.
  • Cecily (Parsley); a rabbit who was featured in the illustrations for Beatrix’ second collection of traditional nursery rhymes.
  • Kitty (-in-Boots); the central character of a tale that was written in 1914 but remained unpublished until the manuscript was discovered in an archive in 2015.

Our name labels are perfect for labelling your children’s belongings safely and securely – even if they’re as adventurous as Peter Rabbit and Benjamin Bunny! Stikins ® use a unique adhesive that is designed to make sure that these name labels simply stick on and stay on – even after repeat trips through the washing machine. Each label simply peels off its backing sheet and can then be applied onto the wash-care label of clothing or directly onto personal items, including shoes and bags, lunch boxes and water bottles, and mobile devices.

Visit our website to find out more about our Stikins ® name labels, to read reviews from families who have used our name labels year after year, or to go ahead and place an order today.

Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Label Planet: Despatch & Delivery For Self-Adhesive Labels From Label Planet

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/








If you’re looking to order self-adhesive labels but you need to know how long it will take for your items arrive, this blog post should have all the answers to your despatch & delivery questions!

Despatch of Self-Adhesive Labels
We try to maintain a wide range of stocked label sizes and materials to allow as many of our customers as possible to purchase labels that can be despatched same day. All of the label products on our website that have a minimum order quantity of 25 SHEETS or 100 SHEETS are stocked items that are available for same day despatch from stock.

Label products with a minimum order quantity of 500 SHEETS are generally made to order items that are despatched within five working days – although standard paper labels are generally kept in stock in larger volumes so we are able to despatch orders for these items much sooner (with standard matt white permanent labels often being available for same day despatch from our warehouse stock).

Made to order items are made on a rotational basis, which means that the time it takes for your labels to be made and despatched depends on when the item(s) you have ordered next appears in the rotation schedule (which takes five working days to cycle through). If you need your labels quickly, remember you can always contact us before placing an order so that we can contact the warehouse and confirm the despatch estimate for the particular item(s) that you want to order.

Delivery Of Self-Adhesive Labels
The delivery service we offer will depend on the quantity of sheets being ordered and the shipping address that you request.

Please note that we ONLY ship to the UK and the Republic of Ireland. 

Standard delivery is by Royal Mail’s first class service or next working day carrier service; this service is included in the prices displayed on our website and is available for all orders with delivery addresses on the UK Mainland.

Standard delivery for Northern Ireland, Islands With UK Postcodes, and “Extended Postcode” regions is via Royal Mail’s first class service or 2-3 working day carrier service, while delivery to the Republic of Ireland is via Royal Mail’s international signed for service or 2-3 working day carrier service – both of which have additional shipping charges. Orders for delivery to the Republic of Ireland, therefore, must be placed by phone so that we can apply the correct shipping option for each particular order.

SMALL ORDERS (25-200 sheets): despatched same day via Royal Mail’s first class service (up to 4:30pm, Mon-Fri)

MEDIUM ORDERS (200-475 sheets): despatched same day via next (working) day carrier service (up to 3pm, Mon-Fri)

LARGE ORDERS (500+ sheets): despatched via next (working) day carrier service (up to 3pm, Mon-Fri) when stock is available; made to order items are despatched within five working days (with standard paper labels being despatched sooner).

Orders for delivery to Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Islands With UK Postcodes, and some “Extended Postcode” regions are despatched on a 2-3 working day carrier service (up to 3pm, Mon-Fri). 

Special Delivery Options For Delivery Of Self-Adhesive Labels
We offer a range of special delivery options if you need to make sure that your labels arrive in plenty of time for an upcoming deadline. These special delivery options include Royal Mail special deliveries (for next day delivery before 1pm, 9am, or 1pm on a Saturday) and timed carrier deliveries (for next day delivery before 10am, 10:30am, or 12pm).

You can request any of these special delivery options by calling our Customer Service Team; they do incur an additional shipping charge but this is the fee that the Royal Mail/carrier provider charges us and we do not add our own shipping charges onto any orders.

Small orders of between 25-200 sheets can also be upgraded to a next day delivery option (for delivery on the next working day before 1pm) during the checkout process.

Remember, you can also check our despatch & delivery information by visiting our Delivery Information page and if you have any questions or concerns about how long it will take for an order to be despatched and delivered to you, you can always get in touch with our Customer Service Team and we’ll be happy to help!

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Label Planet TEMPLATE TUESDAY: Designing A Label Template – Getting Things In Line With The Perfect Alignment

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/label-templates.php







When it comes to label templates there are two kinds of alignment to contend with; first there is the way that your design is aligned within each label and second is the way that your template is aligned on your label sheets when you print your template. As we are currently looking at designing label templates, today’s Template Tuesday will deal with the former form of alignment to help you to create a decorative and professional looking design that is also practical when it comes to getting your printed alignment just right.

Alignment basically refers to the spacing of two or more items and how they are positioned relative to one another (and possibly any other elements around them). For templates, there are two key elements that need to be aligned:
  • The Template Itself; while most label sheets are centrally aligned (i.e. the labels sit in the middle of the sheet so that the top and bottom page margins and the left and right page margins are equal), some are made with an off-centre alignment (causing the page margins to be unequal).
    In this case, alignment refers to how the labels are positioned relative to the A4 sheet.
  • The Content Of The Template; you can choose how you want your design to be aligned within each label – you could centralise your design (so it sits in the middle of each label) or you could choose an off-centre alignment (so it sits closer to one of the edges of each label). You can also give each element within your design its own alignment in order to position all of the elements in a specific way to create the overall layout that you want for your design.
    In this case, alignment refers to how your design and each element within your design is positioned relative to each label or the other elements within your design.
Generally speaking, you won’t need to worry about the alignment of the template itself as this should already have been established for you by the supplier of the template. When it comes to aligning the content of your template, however, the choice is yours and there are a few different options to choose from. In fact, there are NINE alignment options you can choose, based on where your design or element begins vertically (i.e. if it is positioned towards the top, centre, or bottom of a label) and horizontally (i.e. if it is positioned towards the left, centre, or right of a label):

Align Top Left: your design starts from the top left corner of each label.
Align Top Centre: your design starts from the centre of the top edge of each label.
Align Top Right: your design starts from the top right corner of each label.

Align Centre Left: your design starts from the centre of the left edge of each label.
Align Centre: your design starts from the centre of each label.
Align Centre Right: your design starts from the centre of the right edge of each label.

Align Bottom Left: your design starts from the bottom left corner of each label.
Align Bottom Centre: your design starts from the centre of the bottom edge of each label.
Align Bottom Right: your design starts from the bottom right corner of each label.

When designing a label template, you can usually choose to set an overall alignment for your template (so that any element you add should automatically be given that same alignment) and you can set individual alignments for each of the elements within your design.

For example, in a Word template, you can set an overall alignment for your template (and therefore the design that you add to it) by using the alignment tool under the Table Tools Layout Tab AND you can also set individual alignments for the elements that make up your design (including images, text boxes and shapes, and text) by using the alignment tool under the Picture Tools Format Tab / Drawing Tools Format Tab / Home Tab (respectively).
SET AN OVERALL ALIGNMENT FOR YOUR DESIGN
SET AN ALIGNMENT FOR INDIVIDUAL ELEMENTS WITHIN YOUR DESIGN
While you can choose whatever alignment you prefer, we recommend using a centralised layout if possible. This is because this particular alignment causes your design to start in the centre of each label and to expand outwards from this central point; this can help to prevent problems with parts of your design sitting too close to the edges of your labels (which may result in some parts being cut off when you print your labels), helps to prevent white edging around the edges of your labels (because your coloured background doesn’t sit in the right place to cover the entirety of each label), and gives a well balanced look to your label design.

Obviously, we strongly recommend that – whatever alignment you choose – you should always do a test print before printing onto your labels so that you can confirm that your template and printer will produce the correct alignment on your labels AND that the alignment of your design fits practically and attractively inside each label. 

Next week on Template Tuesday: Designing A Label Template – Choosing Suitable Shapes & Logical Layouts

Friday, 21 July 2017

Stikins ® & Trons ®: Go Loony For These Lunar Names Inspired By The Moon

https://www.stikins.co.uk/





Today has a couple of lunar links; it’s generally best known as the day on which Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon but it’s also the day on which the Temple Of Artemis (one of the Seven Wonders of the World) was destroyed – Artemis being a Greek Goddess who was closely associated with the moon.

So we thought we’d go with a lunar theme for this week’s blog and take a look at some names that have been inspired by the moon.

Moon itself has been used as a baby name and there are plenty of names that mean “Moon”, including:

Alcmene ~ Ayla ~ AylínAyselBadarChanHalaHelen ~ JacyJericho ~ Kamaria ~ Lusine/LucineMayarMondayNeoma ~ QamarQuaceyRakesh ~ Selena

There are also plenty of names that have been inspired by Moon Gods and Goddesses (or deities associated with the moon) from across the world, such as:

Arianrhod (Welsh Goddess) ~ Artemis (Greek Goddess; also Cynthia and Delia)
Bulan (Philippine God) ~ Chandra (Hindu God; also Indu) ~ Diana (Roman Goddess)
Elatha (Irish God) ~ Hecate (Greek Goddess) ~ Iah (Egyptian God)
Khonsu (Egyptian God) ~ Losna (Etruscan Goddess) ~ Luna (Roman Goddess)
Mahina (Polynesian Goddess) ~ Máni (Norse God) ~ Marama (Polynesian Goddess)
Mayari (Philippine Goddess) ~ Phoebe (Greek Goddess) ~ Selene (Greek Goddess)
Thoth (Egyptian God) ~ Trivia (Roman Goddess)

At Label Planet, we supply two kinds of stick on name labels; Stikins ® name labels and silver name labels.

Stikins ® are white labels printed with a black font (or left blank if you purchase our Name Label Kit) and are multipurpose name labels that can be used on all kinds of items, including clothing (where they should be applied onto the wash-care label). These stick on name labels were designed with busy families in mind and the one pack can be used to label all kinds of items quickly and securely. They are available in four pack sizes (containing 30, 60, 90, or 120 labels) and are made and despatched same or next working day.

Silver name labels are silver labels printed with a black font and are multipurpose name labels that can be used on all kinds of personal items including shoes and bags, books and stationery kits, P.E. kits, and mobile devices (phones, tablets etc). These name labels allow you to label personal belongings quickly and securely using a decorative label that is both easy to find (when you need it) and discrete (when you don’t need it). Like Stikins ®, they are available in four pack sizes (of 30, 60, 90, or 120 labels) and are made and despatched same or next working day.

To place an order for Stikins ®, the Stikins ® Name Label Kit, or silver name labels (or even all three!), simply head on over to our Buy Name Labels page.

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Label Planet: Picking The Perfect Labels For Your Summer Foodie Projects

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/







Summer is the perfect time for making all sorts of sweet and savoury goodies to enjoy while you (try to) enjoy a bit of summer sun. Whether you’re a home-baker or home-brewer making a few seasonal delights for friends and family or you’re a restaurant or café looking to create a selection of succulent snacks to satisfy summer shoppers, you’ll probably need a few extra labels to get all of your ingredients and products labelled up before they’re handed out.

This blog takes a closer look at the Label Planet labels that are just perfect for labelling food and drink products.

Freezer Labels
Best For: Frozen Foods
If you’re making ice creams or desserts that need to be stored in freezer conditions then our freezer labels are the ideal choice. These paper labels are made with a special freezer adhesive that is suitable for use in temperatures ranging between -40°C to +60°C and was specifically developed for deep freeze label applications (in which other standard adhesives tend to fail).

These white labels can be handwritten or printed using a laser printer; we don’t recommend using an inkjet printer, as the water-based inks will be likely to run and smudge when they are exposed to condensation.

We have eight label sizes available to order for same day despatch from stock, with a further thirty-six label sizes available as made to order bulk boxes.

Water Wash Off Labels
Best For: Labelling Ingredients / Reusable Containers
Water wash off labels are a brilliant solution to the problem of needing to securely label a container (so that the contents can be identified at all times) before removing the label without damaging the container (so that the container can be cleaned and reused).

Our wash off labels are paper labels with a special “wash off” adhesive; this is permanent adhesive creates a strong bond with a surface BUT also breaks down when it is exposed to water (so it doesn't leave behind any adhesive residue or damage the surface). This means that you can safely and securely label food and drink containers so that their contents are clearly identified and then wash the labels off before reusing and relabelling the containers as required.

Again, we have eight label sizes available for same day despatch from stock, with thirty-six additional made to order label sizes.

Waterproof Labels
Best For: Labelling Drink Bottles
If you need labels for drink bottles that are likely to be exposed to condensation or ice, you may want to consider using waterproof labels; these labels will not be damaged by exposure to water or other liquids, which will allow your labels to remain firmly in place and completely legible for the entire length of the application.

These labels need to be printed with a laser printer in order to produce waterproof print and we have a variety of materials options to help you find the perfect label for your products. You can choose between white labels or transparent labels and we also offer options for a gloss finish (a shiny finish) or a matt finish (a dull, non-shiny finish).

We supply seventeen label sizes of waterproof labels as stocked items (packs of 25 sheets available for same day despatch), with a further twenty-seven label sizes available as made to order items (boxes of 500 sheets).

You can view ALL of our label materials on our All Materials page, download a label template from our Label Templates home page, and you can also Request A Sample of any of our label materials to make sure that you pick the perfect stickers for your summery snacks.

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Label Planet TEMPLATE TUESDAY: Designing A Label Template – Copy & Paste 102

Designing A Label Template – Copy & Paste 102







Over the last two Template Tuesdays we've been discussing how "copy and paste" works and how to select items or content (so that you can use copy and paste more efficiently). This Template Tuesday post is all about ways you can combine the two together to create a label template quickly and accurately.

All of our label products are supplied on A4 sheets, which means that all of our label templates represent the layout of all of the labels on a particular sheet. When creating a set of labels that are all the same (or that share common design features), we strongly recommend adding your design to the top left label first and then using copy and paste to add this design to the rest of your labels.

We recommend this particular method for TWO key reasons:
  1. It's a lot quicker than setting up your label design from scratch in every single label - especially if you are printing a label size that is rather small and so features a lot of labels on a single sheet.
  2. It allows you to create a more accurate template; if you set up your design in each label from scratch there is a possibility that you won't set it up in exactly the same way and in exactly the same position each time - which could result in slight misliagnments when you print your labels. If, however, you set up your design once and then use copy and paste to replicate that design in exactly the same way and position in the rest of your labels then you know for certain that your template is as accurate as it can possibly be across the whole sheet.
Selecting and copying your design
As we mentioned in last week's post, you need to select ALL of your label design (including any formatting options you have chosen to use).

In Word, you can do this by moving your cursor to the bottom left corner of the first label and then quickly triple clicking the left button on your mouse.

Next, you copy the contents of that label by either clicking on the "Copy" option in the appropriate menu (in Word, copy is listed under the "Home" tab in the ribbon) OR by using the keyboard shortcut of Control Key (Ctrl) + C [Windows] or Command Key (⌘) + C [Mac].

Selecting the rest of your labels and pasting your design
This step may be more or less complicated depending on the layout of your label sheets. If there are no gaps between your labels you can simply select all of the labels using the point and click method or the click and drag method and paste your design into the rest of your labels in one go.

However, if there are any gaps between your labels you cannot select the whole template because this will result in your design being pasted into the labels AND the gaps between them - ruining the alignment of your template.

In order to use copy and paste to transfer your design into MULTIPLE labels at once you MUST take care when selecting the destinations for your copied design; the area(s) that you select must MATCH the area(s) that you have copied or you will end up pasting your design into the wrong place(s). 

Selecting labels & pasting your design in a template with no gaps between labels:
Use the point and click method or the click and drag method to select (and highlight) all of the labels in your template. Click on the "Paste" option in the appropriate menu (in Word, paste is listed under the "Home" tab in the ribbon) OR use the keyboard shortcut of Control Key (Ctrl) + V [Windows] or Command Key (⌘) + V [Mac].


Selecting labels & pasting your design in a template with gaps between the columns of labels only:
Use the point and click method to select all of the label columns (avoiding the gap columns). Position your cursor above the first label column until it turns into a small solid black arrow pointing downwards and left click once, then move your cursor above the next label column and hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] or Command Key (⌘) [Mac] as you select that label column, and so on until all of the label columns are selected. Then you can paste your design as described above.


Selecting labels & pasting your design in a template with gaps between the columns and rows of labels:
This is the most complicated label layout to paste into because you cannot select entire rows or columns (as you will end up selecting and pasting your design into the gaps between the labels as well as into the labels themselves). However, if you get a bit creative with your selection process and the copy and paste function you can speed things up a bit.

For example, our LP84/46 label size has gaps between the rows and columns. To copy and paste your label design into all of your labels faster than simply pasting into each one individually, follow these simple steps:
  1. Copy and paste your design into each of the labels in the top row (one by one).
  2. Use the click and drag method to select the top TWO rows (this is the top label row and the gap row below it) and copy this selection.
  3. Select the remaining label rows and gap rows EXCEPT for the bottom label row.
  4. Paste your copied area into those rows.
  5. Select the last row that contains your label design and copy that row.
  6. Select the blank bottom label row and paste in your copied area to complete your template.
You can adapt this method however you like to fill in any template where there are gaps between the rows and columns of labels BUT REMEMBER you must match the area you are pasting into with the area that you have copied. For example, if you copy a row of labels and a gap row then the area you paste into must start with a row of labels and end with a gap row - if you copy a label row, the gap row below it, and the label row below that, then you can only paste into an area that contains one label row, the gap row below it, and the label row below that.

Hopefully, you should now be an expert in combining careful selection with copy and paste to create accurate label templates much faster than re-creating your label design in each and every label on your sheet.

Next week on Template Tuesday: Designing A Label Template – Getting Things In Line With The Perfect Alignment

Friday, 14 July 2017

Stikins ® & Trons ®: Winning Names & Fascinating Facts To Celebrate The #Wimbledon Finals

https://www.stikins.co.uk/





This weekend sees the final matches played at Wimbledon to determine just who will be the champions for 2017, so we thought we’d take a look at the tournament and some special names associated with Wimbledon and tennis.

Wimbledon is officially called “The Championships” although it’s known by a number of titles including “The All England Lawn Tennis Championships”, “The Wimbledon Championships”, or just “Wimbledon”. It is held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (All-England Club or AEC for short), which was founded in 1868 as a private croquet club called the All England Croquet Club. It was renamed the All England Croquet and Lawn Tennis Club in 1877 to account for the introduction of a brand new game that had been invented the year before – Sphairistikè or lawn tennis. Later that year the club decided to hold a tennis tournament to raise money to repair the pony roller used to maintain the lawns; 22 amateur players competed for a prize of 12 guineas and a silver cup, with the final being played in front of around 200 people after – rather fittingly – being delayed for three days by rain. The tournament generated a profit of £10 (saving the broken pony roller from the scrap heap) and launched what is now the oldest tennis tournament in the world.

Wimbledon remained a competition for amateur players only until 1968 when the tournament was opened up to allow both professional and amateur players to compete and has expanded from a single event to a tournament made up of five main events (Gentlemen’s Singles, Ladies’ Singles, Gentlemen’s Doubles, Ladies’ Doubles, and Mixed Doubles), four junior events (Boys’ Singles, Girls’ Singles, Boys’ Doubles, and Girls’ Doubles), and seven invitation events (Gentlemen's Invitation Doubles, Ladies' Invitation Doubles, Senior Gentlemen's Invitation Doubles, Gentlemen's Wheelchair Singles, Ladies' Wheelchair Singles, Gentlemen's Wheelchair Doubles, and Ladies' Wheelchair Doubles). The tournament takes place over two weeks and was traditionally scheduled around the last Monday in June – this has now been delayed by a week, with play beginning on the first Monday in July.

It is one of four “Grand Slam” or “Major” tournaments, which are the four most important tennis tournaments held each year – the others are the Australian Open (held in January), the French Open (held in May), and the US Open (held in August/September). Wimbledon is the only major tournament played on grass courts; the French Open takes place on clay courts, while both the Australian Open and US Open take place on hard courts. Winning all four tournaments in one of the five main events in a single year is called a “Grand Slam”, winning all four along with a gold medal at the Summer Olympic Games is a “Golden Grand Slam/Golden Slam”, and if a player also wins the ATP World Tour Final/WTA Tour Championship (held in November) it is a “Super Slam”.

You might not realise it but “Tennis” itself has actually been used as a boy’s name; traditionally, it is an alternative version of “Tennyson” and peaked in popularity in the 1920s.

We’ve taken a look at the lists of Wimbledon champions, top tennis players, and the current top ranking players to find out which names are most popular among these winning players.

MOST POPULAR NAMES FOR WIMBLEDON CHAMPIONS:
John, Frank, Helen, and Margaret
Honourable mentions: Ken, Bob, Martina, and Elizabeth

TOP 5 NAMES FOR TOP RANKING PLAYERS:
John, Frank, Robert, Bill, Mark, Mary, Barbara, Dorothy, Helen, and Andrea

MOST POPULAR NAMES AMONGST THE TOP RANKING PLAYERS OF 2017:
David, Nicolas, Philipp, Alexander, Andre, Andrey, Daniel, Dominic, Gilles, Guillermo, John, Jonathan, Juan, Marc, Marcelo, Mikhail, Pablo, Robert, Sam, Santiago, and Steve

Alison, Anastasia, Andrea, Barbora, Caroline, Daria, Ekaterina, Jelena, Johanna, Julia, Lucie, Madison, María, Monica, Naomi, Sara, Shuai, and Timea

While our name labels might not have won any prizes (yet!), they’re a winning solution to the problem of labelling stuff safely and securely to make sure your children’s belongings don’t go missing. Our multipurpose Stikins ® have been designed for busy families; they simply stick on and stay on – saving time for more important things – and they can be used on all kinds of items, including clothing, shoes and bags, lunch boxes and water bottles, books and stationery, and digital devices including phones and tablets. You could even use them to label up a full tennis kit, including clothes, shoes, rackets, towels, water bottles, AND the bag to put everything in!

You can find out more about Stikins ® by visiting the Information Page or simply head over to the Buy Stikins ® page now to place an order today.

Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Label Planet: Top Tips For Storing Labels In Hot Weather

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/







With summer underway and some good weather - hopefully - on hand, we thought we'd put together a few top tips for storing your labels safely during the summer months (or whenever the Great British Weather decides to behave itself).

All of our labels are self-adhesive labels, which means they are tacky (sticky) at "normal" room temperatures - and so only require light pressure from a finger or hand to create a strong adhesive bond upon contact with a surface.

This does mean that the quality of the adhesive bond can be influenced by the temperature - during storage, application, and the duration of the label application. High temperatures tend to speed up the process of adhesion (causing the adhesive to set more quickly) and low temperatures tend to slow down or even prevent the adhesive process altogether. This means that if your labels get too hot or too cold, the quality of the adhesive bond that they can maintain will deteriorate.

High temperatures can also cause adhesive bleed; this is when the adhesive starts to spread out from the adhesive layer, where it can penetrate into the other layers of the labels themselves (and possibly damage these labels, for example by causing discolouration of the face material) or emerge from around the edges of the labels. This can cause problems when you try to print your label sheets as they may not feed correctly, which can cause print misalignment or may lead to your sheets getting jammed in your printer.

Therefore we recommend following these simple steps to store your self-adhesive labels safely so they retain their original quality for when you need to use them next:
  • Keep your labels in their original plastic packaging
  • Store your labels away from direct sunlight
  • Make sure the room temperature doesn't exceed 25 degrees (and avoid spaces with fluctuating temperatures if possible)
  • Never store unused labels in the printer tray or next to the printer (or any other electrical devices) as the printer may get hot during usage.
Hopefully there is still some good weather to come over the summer months (and maybe even beyond) but - with these top tips - you can rest assured that your labels will be ready and waiting for you the next time you need to print some labels.

You can find more of our TOP TIPS in our Help Section, along with advice on how to design and print your own self-adhesive labels.

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Label Planet TEMPLATE TUESDAY: Designing A Label Template – How To Select (Highlight) Content In Word

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/label-templates.php







Last week, we looked the functions cut, copy, and paste; as part of this, we described how – before you cut or copy an item or content – you need to first select the item or content that you want to transfer. While many people will already know how to select items and content, others may not know how to do this, and there are a few hints and tips that can help save you some time. So this week’s blog post will be all about how to select (or highlight) items and content – using Word as an example.

Selecting Items
To select an item you simply need to left click on it once using your mouse; however, depending on the item you need to select, you may need to click in a specific position on the item to select the entire item (rather than just an element within that item).

For example, if you need to select an image or a shape, you can click ANYWHERE within that item to select it. The cursor will change to a white arrow with a four headed black arrow behind it, "sizing handles" (round circles) will appear at the four corners and in the middle of the four sides of the item, and the relevant Format tab will be displayed at the top of the ribbon (for images this is the Picture Tools format tab and for shapes it is the Drawing Tools format tab).

When selecting a text box, however, your cursor must be positioned over one of the edges of the box (and in the shape of a white arrow with a four headed black arrow behind it) to select the whole text box. If you click within the text box (with the cursor as a plain white arrow), you will be selecting the TEXT within the box and not the box itself.

Likewise, if you want to select an entire table, you will need to place your cursor over the box containing a black four headed arrow at the top left of the table. Your cursor will turn into a white arrow with a black four headed arrow behind it and (once you have left clicked to select the table) the table will be highlighted by a light grey background to indicate that the ENTIRE table has been selected.
Selecting Multiple Items
To select multiple items you simply need to hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] or Command Key (⌘) [Mac] as you left click on each item in turn. As each subsequent item is selected the sizing handles will appear at the four corners and along the four sides and your cursor will take the shape of a white arrow with a plus sign and a rectangle shape behind it.

NB: if one (or more) of the items you are selecting is an image you will need to change the default Wrap Text format from "In Line With Text" to "Tight" or "In Front Of Text" before you can select the image along with other items. To do this you simply left click on the image to bring up the Picture Tools Format tab at the top of the page, click on Wrap Text, and select "Tight" or "In Front Of Text". 

Alternatively, you can place your cursor above and to the left of the first item you want to select, click and hold down the left button on your mouse as you drag your cursor so that it is positioned below and to the right of the last item, and then release the button. This will highlight all of the items that fall within the area outlined by your starting and finishing positions - so you can cut or copy these items although you won't be able to move them as you would if you selected them using the point and click method described above.

Selecting Text
You can select text using the click and drag method described above; simply position your cursor at the start of the text you want to select, click and hold down the left button as you move your cursor so that it is positioned at the end of the text you want to select, and then release the button. The text you have selected will now be highlighted by a light grey background.


Selecting The Contents Of A Table Cell
When creating a label template for labels on sheets, we strongly recommend creating your design in the top left label and then using copy and paste to fill in the rest of the labels. This means you need to be able to select your design from the first cell in a way that copies not only the content itself but also any formatting options you have used to create that particular design.
The best way to do this is to:
  • Move your cursor into the bottom left corner of the cell you want to select. Quickly triple click the left button to select the contents of the cell (which will be highlighted by a light grey background).
  • Alternatively, you can move your cursor to the left hand side of the cell you want to select until the cursor turns into a small solid black arrow pointing diagonally up and right. Left click once to select the contents of the cell (which will be highlighted by a light grey background). This method isn't always available (it depends on how the label template you are using has been formatted) and it can be tricky to get your cursor in precisely the right position to turn it into the small solid black arrow.
Selecting Multiple Cells (To Paste Content)
When filling in the rest of your labels you can simply paste your design into each cell one by one (left click inside a cell once to select it). This method is fine if you only have a few labels per sheet BUT can become quite time consuming if you have a lot of smaller labels to fill in.

In this case you can select all of the cells (if there are NO gaps between the labels) using the click and drag method; position your cursor in the top left cell, click and hold down the left button as you move your cursor to the bottom right cell, and then release the button. All of the cells will be selected and highlighted by a light grey background.

If there ARE any gaps between the labels you CANNOT use this method as it will add your design to the gaps (as well as the labels themselves), which will destroy the alignment of your template.

In this case, you might be able to speed up the process by selecting entire columns using the point and click method; position your cursor at the top of a column until it turns into a small solid black arrow pointing downwards and then left click once to select the entire column. You can select multiple columns by holding down the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] or Command Key (⌘) [Mac] as you click above each column. Each cell within a selected column will have a strip of a light grey background going through it (see below). You cannot use this method if there are gaps between the rows of labels as well as between the columns (see next week's post for further information).



Hopefully, this post should help you to select any content within Word that you need to use to create your label design. Next week we'll be combining this week's post and last week's post (Copy & Paste 101) to guide you through the process of using copy and paste to complete a label template once you have created your design in the top left label.

Next week on Template Tuesday: Designing A Label Template – Copy & Paste 102

Friday, 7 July 2017

Stikins ® & Trons ®: Name Labels Vs Sun Creams - How To Make Your Labels Last All Summer Long

https://www.stikins.co.uk/





You may have noticed that we describe our Stikins ® name labels and Trons ® name transfers as being “resistant to children’s alcohol-free sun creams and lotions” and perhaps wondered why we mention sun creams as being a particular problem for name label products.

Name labels are often applied into clothing where they come into contact with skin OR onto personal items (especially lunch boxes and water bottles) that are handled a lot, which may result in sun cream being transferred from the skin onto a name label. Modern sun creams are made with increasingly advanced ingredients designed to boost the protection offered by these products (for example by increasing the level of protection, improving water resistance or durability, or simply making a product easier to apply) and, while these ingredients do make sun creams and lotions extremely effective, they can also be quite damaging to the surfaces that they come into contact with over time – including name labels.

While name labels themselves are unlikely to be damaged (they are, after all, designed to withstand repeat cycles through washing machines and/or dishwashers), the printing inks used to personalise these labels may not be resistant to some of the ingredients used in sun creams and lotions – which can result in the print disintegrating or smearing away completely.

Beating The “Blockers”
Sun creams and lotions often contain “blockers”, which are ingredients that protect us from sunlight by preventing (or blocking) ultraviolet light from reaching our skin (by reflecting, scattering, or absorbing UV rays). A common example is titanium dioxide, which is a particularly popular ingredient because it is believed to be less irritating than other chemicals – making it ideal for use in products that are intended to be used by children or individuals with sensitive skin.

While titanium dioxide is brilliant at providing protection against harmful UV light, it is also extremely damaging to some printing inks – which is why we have sourced an advanced ink for our name label products that is fully resistant to titanium dioxide (as well as other similar ingredients used to produce sun creams and lotions).

The Problem With “Alcohol”
Unfortunately, there is one ingredient used in SOME sun creams and lotions that our ink is NOT currently resistant to – and that is alcohol. Alcohols are used in sun creams and lotions for a variety of reasons; some make sun creams more opaque (less transparent) or thicker or less greasy, some act as emollients (moisturisers), some help to preserve sun creams (so they last longer “on the shelf"), and some are used as carriers – particularly in sun sprays, where the alcohol helps to propel the spray more efficiently.

The problem is that alcohols are solvents; solvents are capable of dissolving other substances and this includes some printing inks used to personalise name labels. While our printing ink is not fully resistant to alcohol (or other solvents), this doesn’t mean that your name labels won’t survive the summer.

Firstly, alcohol is only used in SOME sun cream products and many manufacturers offer alcohol-free alternatives. Sun creams and lotions designed for children and individuals with sensitive skin are – as a general rule – among these alcohol-free product ranges.

Secondly, the risk of damage tends to exist immediately after a product has been applied (i.e. while the sun cream is drying or being absorbed into the skin); as long as you allow plenty of time for your sun cream product to dry or absorb in place, there won’t be any danger of the alcohol coming into contact with, and therefore damaging, the print on your name labels.

You can find out much more about our name labels by visiting our Stikins ® Information Page or our Trons ® Information Page – alternatively, you can visit our Stikins ® and Trons ® product pages to place an order for your very own name labels that will remain firmly in place all summer – and all year – long.

Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Label Planet: FAQ – What Label Sizes Do You Supply (& Why Those Sizes Anyway)?

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/







Customers often come to us with a particular label size in mind – which we may or may not supply. Generally speaking, if we don’t supply a particular size we are usually able to offer a suitable alternative BUT in some cases we simply won’t have a label size that comes close to a customer’s requested measurements. At Label Planet, we specialise in supplying A4 sheets of self-adhesive labels, which means that – while we try to offer the best possible range of label sizes – there are a number of factors that determine the number of label sizes we are able to supply as well as the actual measurements of those label sizes…
  1. We are a label supplier (not a label manufacturer).
    We only supply label sizes that are already available as pre-existing “standard label sizes” and we do not manufacture bespoke labels to suit a customer’s unique set of requirements.
  1. We aim to supply customers with quality labels at competitive prices.
    Standard sizes are made in bulk on a regular basis and have much lower manufacturing costs than bespoke items (that are made in smaller quantities as and when they are requested – sometimes with the added cost of having a die cutter made to produce labels in the exact size and layout required), which allows us to offer our customers much better prices.
  1. We specialise in supplying labels on A4 sheets.
    The label sizes we supply are largely determined by the dimensions of an A4 sheet (210mm wide by 297mm high); standard label sizes are created by dividing up an A4 sheet into a number of equal rows and columns, which is why certain measurements crop up over and over again. For example, if you divide a sheet into two you get 105mm (or 99.1mm if you leave a gap between the labels) and if you divide it into three you get 70mm (or 63.5mm), which is why we have a number of label sizes that have these measurements as their widths.
    Manufacturers also prefer to make products that have as little waste material as possible, which means that standard label sizes tend to be those that are created when a sheet is divided up into individual labels with no gaps between or around the labels at all AND/OR that provide a narrow selvedge (blank strip) around the edge of the sheet AND/OR have narrow gaps between the labels to create a layout that is easier to design and print accurately.
  1. We aim to supply labels that are easy for our customers to print themselves.
    Some label sizes and layouts are more difficult to design and print accurately, while others create practical difficulties when it comes to printing labels using a standard desktop printer. For example, most standard desktop printers cannot print all the way to the edge of an A4 sheet (leaving an unprintable area around the edge of the sheet), which means that many of our label sizes have selvedges (or blank strips) around the sheet to avoid this issue. We also avoid supplying very large label sizes because they tend to waste a lot of material and we avoid very small label sizes because they carry a risk of separating from the backing sheet as they are pulled through the rollers in desktop printers.
  1. We have limited shelf space.
    We aim to supply as wide a range of label sizes as possible so our customers can visit our website confident in the knowledge that they should be able to find a suitable label for their particular application – with many of our most popular label sizes available for same day despatch from stock. HOWEVER, we also have limited space for stock and it would be extremely impractical (indeed impossible) to maintain a label range that offers every possible label size and material combination.
    Therefore, we have tried to select label sizes that are suitable for a miscellany of purposes so that as many customers as possible will be able to visit our site and find a size that is suitable for their application.
You can view our full range of label sizes by visiting our Labels Listed By Width and Labels Listed By Height pages – and you can find all of the material options for each label size by visiting the relevant template information page (found via our Template Home Page OR by clicking on the “Label Templates And Printing Information” link displayed on every product page).

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Label Planet TEMPLATE TUESDAY: Designing A Label Template – Copy & Paste 101

https://www.labelplanet.co.uk/label-templates.php







You may have noticed that our advice pages highly recommend using copy and paste when designing label templates so this week we’re taking a closer look at what “copy and paste” means and how it works.

“Copy and paste” actually refers to two separate computer functions that are combined to transfer data from one place to another – first by “copying” an item and then “pasting” that item elsewhere.

There are THREE computer functions that can be used to transfer data:

CUT, COPY, and PASTE

These three individual functions are used to transfer data in one of two ways – either by using the cut function followed by the paste function (known as “cut and paste”) or by using the copy function followed by the paste function (known as “copy and paste”).

In other words, cut and copy indicate the item(s) that you want to transfer and paste actually transfers the item(s). These functions can be used to transfer all kinds of data, including images, text, or entire files and/or folders.

DEFINITIONS

CUT: a selected item is removed – or cut – from its original location and is placed in a temporary storage tool on your device known as the “clipboard”.

COPY: a selected item is duplicated – or copied – so that the item remains in its original location, while the duplicate is placed in the clipboard.

PASTE: the most recent item stored in the clipboard is inserted into the new location that you have selected.

Cut and paste were named after the traditional process of editing manuscripts, where an editor would use scissors to cut paragraphs out of a page and would then use paste (glue) to stick the paragraphs onto a new page.

CUT AND PASTE vs COPY AND PASTE 

While both processes can be used to transfer data, cut and paste REMOVES data from its original location whereas copy and paste LEAVES data in its original location.

In other words, only copy and paste will duplicate your item(s), which makes it the ideal tool for designing templates for labels on sheets – you can transfer data into your template (for example, by copying text from another document) and duplicate your design from one label into all of the remaining labels in your template.

We recommend designing templates in this way because it improves the accuracy of your template; if you set up your design in each label from scratch it is possible that you might not line up your design in exactly the same position each time – whereas, if you set up your design in the top left label and use copy and paste to complete the rest of the labels they will all be set up in exactly the same position within each label.

HOW TO CUT, COPY, & PASTE

Cut, copy, and paste are standard functions that can be used to transfer data in a number of ways (including within a single document/piece of software/folder OR between different documents/pieces of software/folders), and there are a variety of ways to perform these functions.

First you select your item(s):
  • Individual Item: left click once on the item using your mouse.
  • Multiple Items: hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] or Command Key (⌘) [Mac] on your keyboard as you left click once on each item using your mouse.
  • Multiple Items (List): left click once on the first item using your mouse then hold down the Shift Key on your keyboard as you left click once on the last item using your mouse.
  • Text: move your mouse so the cursor is positioned at the start of the text you want to select, press and hold down the left button on your mouse, then move your mouse so the cursor is positioned at the end of the text you want to select and let go.

PC Keyboard via Wikimedia Commons & Apple Keyboard By Wiki637 via Wikimedia Commons

The Point & Click Method
This method involves using your mouse to click on cut, copy, and paste menu options or icons. Most software will allow you to access these functions using the left or right button on your mouse.

If you are using a one-button mouse with a Mac or a Macbook trackpad, you can access the right click function by holding down the Control Key on your keyboard as you click your mouse or tap on the trackpad.

Left Click: usually these functions are listed under the “Edit” menu at the top/left of your window, although there are exceptions (for example, in most versions of Word, they are listed under the “Home” tab in the ribbon at the top of the window).

Right Click: some software will display a popup box containing a selection of relevant tools when you right click on an item or location. For example, if you right click on text in Word you will see the below popup box.



Drag & Drop
This method involves using your mouse to drag an item from one location to another. This method can be used to cut and paste or copy and paste; while it is especially popular for transferring data between two different documents/pieces of software/folders, it can also be used to transfer data within a single document/piece of software/folder.

To drag an item, you simply select it and then hold down the left button on your mouse as you move your cursor to the new location. You then drop your item into its new location by releasing the button.

Generally speaking, this sequence will perform the “cut and paste” process – to “copy and paste”, you simply hold down the Control Key (Windows) or Option Key (Mac) on your keyboard while you drag and drop your item.

You should be able to check if you are about to “cut and paste” or “copy and paste” by looking at the prompt or icon that appears onscreen as you drag your cursor to the new location. 

For example, when transferring a file between two folders in Window’s File Explorer, the prompt will say “Move to [new location]” if you are using “cut and paste” or “Copy to [new location]” if you are using “copy and paste” . 

In Word, you will a small icon beside your cursor as you drag an item to a new location; if you are using “cut and paste” this will be a rectangle, while if you are using “copy and paste” this will be a rectangle with a plus sign, as shown below.

Keyboard Shortcuts
As cut, copy, and paste are such popular functions, there are keyboard shortcuts that can be used instead of the Point & Click and Drag & Drop methods.

WINDOWS:
hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) and press X to cut, C to copy, or V to paste.

MAC:
hold down the Command Key (⌘) and then press X to cut, C to copy, or V to paste.

If you've never used cut, copy, and paste before it can be quite confusing BUT these tools are incredibly useful when it comes to creating accurate label templates quickly. Hopefully, this guide should have given you a better understanding of what these functions are and how they work.

Next week on Template Tuesday: Designing A Label Template – How To Select (Highlight) Content In Word